Witch calender events for 2014

Pagans and Wiccans love to celebrate, and as the Wheel of the Year turns, a number of milestones are reached. Each is a time for gathering together with friends and family, working on our spiritual development, and feasting and merrymaking! The following is a list of dates for 2014, as well as resources for celebration in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

***Please note that the full moon dates and times are based upon the Farmer’s Almanac schedules, which is listed in Eastern Standard Time.

 January

1st: New Moon 11:15 am , Hag’s Day – Honoring the Goddess as she who transforms!, New years Day, Birthday of folklorist Sir James Frazier, 1854

6th: Triple Goddess Day- Honoring the Goddess as the three-in-one, Also the Day Of The Lord of the Dance Honoring shiva, seeking his aid for prosperity  and wisdom in the new year, and also a spouse if desired.

8th: 1st Quarter moon 3:40am

13th: Last of Austria’s witchcraft laws repealed in 1787

16th: Full moon 4:53

18th:Day of Danu- celebrating the Great Goddess who shows the way.

19th: Birthday of Dorothy Clutterbuck

20th: Celtic Tree Month of Birch ends

21st: Celtic Tree Month of Rowan begins

24th: Last Quarter Moon 5:20

25th: Birthday of poet Robert Burns, 1759

28th: Up Helly Aa celebration, Shetland Islands, Scotland

30th: New Moon 11:39 pm, Birthday of Z Budapest, founder of Dianic Wicca

February

2nd: Imbolc, & Lammas or Lughnasadh (Southern Hemisphere), Roman celebration of Februalia

6th: First Quarter Moon 7:23pm

12th: Death of Gerald Gardner in 1964

14th: Valentine’s Day & Full moon, Quickening Moon at 6:53 pm

15th: Lupercalia, Pan’s day-Honoring the lord of the wilderness

17th: Celtic Tree Month of Rowan ends

18th: Celtic Tree Month of Ash begins

21st: Birthday of author Patricia Telesco

22: Birthday of author Sybil Leek

28th: Cake Day- offering little cakes to the God and Goddess and remembering your ancestors.

March

1st: New Moon 8:00 am, Matronalia, the Festival of Women

6th: Birthday of “official witch of Salem” Laurie Cabot in 1933

8th: First Quarter Moon 1:27pm

16th: Full moon — Storm Moon at 1:08 pm

17th: St. Patrick’s Day, Celtic Tree Month of Ash ends

18th: Celtic Tree Month of Alder begins

20th: Beginning of Spring, Ostara, Mabon (Southern Hemisphere)

26th: Birthday of author and folklorist Joseph Campbell

28th: Death of author Scott Cunningham in 1993

30th: New Moon 6:45pm

April

6th: National Tartan Day

7th: First Quarter Moon 8:27am

14th: Celtic Tree Month of Alder ends

15th: Full moon — Wind Moon at 3:42 am, Celtic Tree Month of Willow begins,

16th: Birthday of author Margot Adler

22nd: Earth Day

23rd: Wiccan pentacle is officially added to the list of VA-approved emblems for gravestones,07

29th: New Moon 6:15am

30th: Walpurgisnacht celebrated by German witches

May

1st: Beltane, Samhain (Southern Hemisphere)

5th: Cinco de Mayo

7th First Quarter Moon 3:16am

11th: Mother’s Day

12th: Celtic Tree Month of Willow ends

13th: Celtic Tree Month of Hawthorn begins

14th: Full moon 3:16 pm

21st: Last Quarter Moon 1:00pm

28th: New Moon 6:14 am

June

1st: England’s Witchcraft Act of 1563 goes into effect

5th: First Quarter Moon 8:39pm

9th: Celtic Tree Month of Hawthorn ends

10th: Celtic Tree Month of Oak begins, Hanging of Bridget Bishop, first victim in the Salem Witch Trials

13th: Full moon 12:11 am, 13th: Birthday of Gerald Gardner in 1884

15th: Father’s Day

17th: Birthday of Wiccan author Starhawk

19th: Last Quarter Moon 6:39pm

21st: Beginning of Summer, Summer Solstice Sabbat Midsummer A.k.a Litha, Yule (Southern Hemisphere)

22nd: England’s last Witchcraft Law is repealed in 1951

27th: New Moon 8:09 am, Birthday of author Scott Cunningham in 1956

 

July

4th: Independence Day

5th: First Quarter Moon 12:00am

7th: Celtic Tree Month of Oak ends

8th: Celtic Tree Month of Holly begins

12th: Full moon 7:25 am

13th: Birthday of Dr. John Dee in 1527

19th: Last Quarter Moon 2:09am, Rebecca Nurse is hanged in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692

26th: New Moon 10:42 pm

August

1st: Lammas or Lughnasadh, Imbolc (Southern Hemisphere), Birthday of medium Edward Kelley, 1555

2nd – 4th: Dublin Irish Festival (Dublin, OH)

4th: First Quarter Moon, Moon Celtic Tree Month of Holly ends

5th: Celtic Tree Month of Hazel begins

10th: Full Moon — Corn Moon at 2:09 pm

15th: Birthday of Charles Leland, folklorist and author, 1824

17th: Last Quarter Moon

20th: Birthday of author Ann Moura in 1947

25th: New Moon 2:13 pm

31st: Birthday of author Raymond Buckland

September

1st: Celtic Tree Month of Hazel ends

2nd: First Quarter Moon, Celtic Tree Month of Vine begins

9th: Full Moon

10th: Birthday of Carl Llewellyn Weschcke

14th: Birthday of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa in 1486, Birthday of author Ellen Dugan

17th: Television welcomes Bewitched in 1964

21st: International Day of Peace

23rd: Fall Begins, Fall Equinox or Mabon, Ostara (Southern Hemisphere)

24th: New Moon

29th: Celtic Tree Month of Vine ends

30th: Celtic Tree Month of Ivy begins

 

October

1st: Birthday of Isaac Bonewits, founder of Ár nDraíocht Féin

8th: Full moon

12th: Birthday of occultist Aleister Crowley, 1875

18th: Birthday of Nicholas Culpeper, noted herbalist, in 1616

20th: Birthday of Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary

23rd: New Moon

27th: Celtic Tree Month of Ivy ends

28th: Celtic Tree Month of Reed begins

31st: First Quarter Moon, Samhain, Beltane (Southern Hemisphere), Day Of the Dead, Halloween, Covenant of the Goddess formed in 1975

November

1st: Mexico’s Day of the Dead, All Saints Day

2nd: Birthday of Wiccan author Sirona Knight

6th: Full moon

11th: Veteran’s Day

14th: Last Quarter Moon

22nd: New Moon

24th: Celtic Tree Month of Reed ends

25th: Celtic Tree Month of Elder begins

28th: Thanksgiving day (United States)

29th: First Quarter Moon

30th: Birthday of Oberon Zell-Ravenheart, founder of Church of All Worlds, Festival of Hecate Trivia

December

6th: Full moon – Long Nights Moon at 7:27 am, Krampusnacht

14th: Last Quarter Moon

17th: Beginning of Saturnalia

21st: Winter Solstice or Yule, Litha (Southern Hemisphere)

22nd: New Moon, Celtic Tree Month of Elder ends

20th: Celtic Tree Month of Birch begins

21st: Winter Starts

22nd: New Moon

25th: Christmas Day, Feast of Frau Holle, Germanic goddess

28th: First Quarter Moon

31st: Festival of Hogmanay, New years eve

 

 

 

 

 

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Yule!

YULE is amazing!

It is a time to spend with friends family and live in harmony!

It is so easy to create an altar for Yule

Burn: Bayberry, Chamomile,frankincense, rosemary, sage.

Decorate: w/ Holly, Juniper, mistletoe, moss, oak, cedar, pine cones, evergreen blessed thistle.

Use things from outside to be the green cheep witch just because you didn’t buy something from a store does not mean it is not just as good! It comes from your heart as does all magic!

Also deck the halls is a pagan solstice song you and your coven can chant !

Here is a chant that is perfect for Yule!!

God Rest Ye Merry Pagan Folk

“Gods rest ye merry pagan folk
Let none of you dismay.
Remember that the Sun returns
Upon this Solstice Day
The growing dark is ended now
And spring is on its way

Oh tidings of comfort and Joy
Comfort and Joy
Oh tidings of comfort and Joy

The winter’s worst still lies ahead
Fierce Tempest Snow and Rain
Beneath the blanket on the ground
The Spark of life remains
The Sun’s warm rays caress the seeds
To raise Life’s song again

Oh tidings of comfort and Joy
Comfort and Joy
Oh tidings of comfort and Joy

Within the blessed apple lies
The promise of the Queen
For from this pentacle shall rise
The orchards fresh and green
The Earth shall blossom once again
The air be sweet and clean

Oh tidings of comfort and Joy
Comfort and Joy
Oh tidings of comfort and Joy”

The date varies from December 20 to December 23 depending on the year in the Gregorian calendar.  Yule is also known as the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere and the summer solstice in the southern hemisphere due to the seasonal differences.

Yule, (pronounced EWE-elle) is when the dark half of the year relinquishes to the light half. Starting the next morning at sunrise, the sun climbs just a little higher and stays a little longer in the sky each day. Known as Solstice Night, or the longest night of the year, the sun’s “rebirth” was celebrated with much joy. On this night, our ancestors celebrated the rebirth of the Oak King, the Sun King, the Giver of Life that warmed the frozen Earth. From this day forward, the days would become longer.

Bonfires were lit in the fields, and crops and trees were “wassailed” with toasts of spiced cider.  Children were escorted from house to house with gifts of clove spiked apples and oranges which were laid in baskets of evergreen boughs and wheat stalks dusted with flour. The apples and oranges represented the sun.  The boughs were symbolic of immortality (evergreens were sacred to the Celts because they did not “die” thereby representing the eternal aspect of the Divine). The wheat stalks portrayed the harvest, and the flour was accomplishment of triumph, light, and life. Holly and ivy not only decorated the outside, but also the inside of homes, in hopes Nature Sprites would come and join the celebration. A sprig of Holly was kept near the door all year long as a constant invitation for good fortune to visit tthe residents. Mistletoe was also hung as decoration.  It represented the seed of the Divine, and at Midwinter, the Druids would travel deep into the forest to harvest it.

The ceremonial Yule log was the highlight of the Solstice festival. In accordance to tradition, the log must either have been harvested from the householder’s land, or given as a gift… it must never have been bought. Once dragged into the house and placed in the fireplace it was decorated in seasonal greenery, doused with cider or ale, and dusted with flour before set ablaze by a piece of last years log, (held onto for just this purpose). The log would burn throughout the night, then smolder for 12 days after before being ceremonially put out. Ash is the traditional wood of the Yule log. It is the sacred world tree of the Teutons, known as Yggdrasil. An herb of the Sun, Ash brings light into the hearth at the Solstice.

A different type of Yule log, and perhaps one more suitable for modern practitioners would be the type that is used as a base to hold three candles. Find a smaller branch of oak or pine, and flatten one side so it sets upright. Drill three holes in the top side to hold red, green, and white (season), green, gold, and black (the Sun God), or white, red, and black (the Great Goddess). Continue to decorate with greenery, red and gold bows, rosebuds, cloves, and dust with flour.

Many customs created around Yule are identified with Christmas today.  If you decorate your home with a Yule tree, holly or candles, you are following some of these old traditions.   The Yule log, (usually made from a piece of wood saved from the previous year) is burned in the fire to symbolize the Newborn Sun/Son.

Deities of Yule:  All Newborn Gods, Sun Gods, Mother Goddesses, and Triple Goddesses. The best known would be the Dagda, and Brighid, the daughter of the Dagda. Brighid taught the smiths the arts of fire tending and the secrets of metal work. Brighid’s flame, like the flame of the new light, pierces the darkness of the spirit and mind, while the Dagda’s cauldron assures that Nature will always provide for all the children.

Symbolism of Yule:
Rebirth of the Sun, The longest night of the year, The Winter Solstice, Introspect, Planning for the Future.

Symbols of Yule:
Yule log, or small Yule log with 3 candles, evergreen boughs or wreaths, holly, mistletoe hung in doorways, gold pillar candles, baskets of clove studded fruit, a simmering pot of wassail, poinsettias, christmas cactus.

Herbs of Yule:
Bayberry, blessed thistle, evergreen, frankincense holly, laurel, mistletoe, oak, pine, sage, yellow cedar.

Foods of Yule:
Cookies and caraway cakes soaked in cider, fruits, nuts, pork dishes, turkey, eggnog, ginger tea, spiced cider, wassail, or lamb’s wool (ale, sugar, nutmeg, roasted apples).

Incense of Yule:
Pine, cedar, bayberry, cinnamon.

Colors of Yule:
Red, green, gold, white, silver, yellow, orange.

Stones of Yule:
Rubies, bloodstones, garnets, emeralds, diamonds.

Activities of Yule:
Caroling, wassailing the trees, burning the Yule log, decorating the Yule tree, exchanging of presents, kissing under the mistletoe, honoring Kriss Kringle the Germanic Pagan God of Yule

Spellworkings of Yule:
Peace, harmony, love, and increased happiness.

Deities of Yule:
Goddesses-Brighid, Isis, Demeter, Gaea, Diana, The Great Mother. Gods-Apollo, Ra, Odin, Lugh, The Oak King, The Horned One, The Green Man, The Divine Child, Mabon.

Yule-Winter Solstice is coming!!!

Winter Solstice is coming!!

The date varies from December 20 to December 23 depending on the year in the Gregorian calendar.  Yule is also known as the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere and the summer solstice in the southern hemisphere due to the seasonal differences.

 

Yule, (pronounced EWE-elle) is when the dark half of the year relinquishes to the light half. Starting the next morning at sunrise, the sun climbs just a little higher and stays a little longer in the sky each day. Known as Solstice Night, or the longest night of the year, the sun’s “rebirth” was celebrated with much joy. On this night, our ancestors celebrated the rebirth of the Oak King, the Sun King, the Giver of Life that warmed the frozen Earth. From this day forward, the days would become longer.

Bonfires were lit in the fields, and crops and trees were “wassailed” with toasts of spiced cider.  Children were escorted from house to house with gifts of clove spiked apples and oranges which were laid in baskets of evergreen boughs and wheat stalks dusted with flour. The apples and oranges represented the sun.  The boughs were symbolic of immortality (evergreens were sacred to the Celts because they did not “die” thereby representing the eternal aspect of the Divine). The wheat stalks portrayed the harvest, and the flour was accomplishment of triumph, light, and life. Holly and ivy not only decorated the outside, but also the inside of homes, in hopes Nature Sprites would come and join the celebration. A sprig of Holly was kept near the door all year long as a constant invitation for good fortune to visit tthe residents. Mistletoe was also hung as decoration.  It represented the seed of the Divine, and at Midwinter, the Druids would travel deep into the forest to harvest it.

The ceremonial Yule log was the highlight of the Solstice festival. In accordance to tradition, the log must either have been harvested from the householder’s land, or given as a gift… it must never have been bought. Once dragged into the house and placed in the fireplace it was decorated in seasonal greenery, doused with cider or ale, and dusted with flour before set ablaze by a piece of last years log, (held onto for just this purpose). The log would burn throughout the night, then smolder for 12 days after before being ceremonially put out. Ash is the traditional wood of the Yule log. It is the sacred world tree of the Teutons, known as Yggdrasil. An herb of the Sun, Ash brings light into the hearth at the Solstice.

A different type of Yule log, and perhaps one more suitable for modern practitioners would be the type that is used as a base to hold three candles. Find a smaller branch of oak or pine, and flatten one side so it sets upright. Drill three holes in the top side to hold red, green, and white (season), green, gold, and black (the Sun God), or white, red, and black (the Great Goddess). Continue to decorate with greenery, red and gold bows, rosebuds, cloves, and dust with flour.

Many customs created around Yule are identified with Christmas today.  If you decorate your home with a Yule tree, holly or candles, you are following some of these old traditions.   The Yule log, (usually made from a piece of wood saved from the previous year) is burned in the fire to symbolize the Newborn Sun/Son.

Deities of Yule:  All Newborn Gods, Sun Gods, Mother Goddesses, and Triple Goddesses. The best known would be the Dagda, and Brighid, the daughter of the Dagda. Brighid taught the smiths the arts of fire tending and the secrets of metal work. Brighid’s flame, like the flame of the new light, pierces the darkness of the spirit and mind, while the Dagda’s cauldron assures that Nature will always provide for all the children.

Symbolism of Yule:
Rebirth of the Sun, The longest night of the year, The Winter Solstice, Introspect, Planning for the Future.

Symbols of Yule:
Yule log, or small Yule log with 3 candles, evergreen boughs or wreaths, holly, mistletoe hung in doorways, gold pillar candles, baskets of clove studded fruit, a simmering pot of wassail, poinsettias, christmas cactus.

Herbs of Yule:
Bayberry, blessed thistle, evergreen, frankincense holly, laurel, mistletoe, oak, pine, sage, yellow cedar.

Foods of Yule:
Cookies and caraway cakes soaked in cider, fruits, nuts, pork dishes, turkey, eggnog, ginger tea, spiced cider, wassail, or lamb’s wool (ale, sugar, nutmeg, roasted apples).

Incense of Yule:
Pine, cedar, bayberry, cinnamon.

Colors of Yule:
Red, green, gold, white, silver, yellow, orange.

Stones of Yule:
Rubies, bloodstones, garnets, emeralds, diamonds.

Activities of Yule:
Caroling, wassailing the trees, burning the Yule log, decorating the Yule tree, exchanging of presents, kissing under the mistletoe, honoring Kriss Kringle the Germanic Pagan God of Yule

Spellworkings of Yule:
Peace, harmony, love, and increased happiness.

Deities of Yule:
Goddesses-Brighid, Isis, Demeter, Gaea, Diana, The Great Mother. Gods-Apollo, Ra, Odin, Lugh, The Oak King, The Horned One, The Green Man, The Divine Child, Mabon.